Jaime Harrison / Facebook page

Jaime Harrison / Facebook page

South Carolina Democrat Jaime Harrison has left his position as a top lobbyist for the Podesta Group as he attempts to rally support behind his bid to be chairman of the Democratic National Committee.

French President Hollande Says He Won’t Seek Reelection

French President Francois Hollande / REUTERS

French President Francois Hollande said on Thursday he would not seek a second term in next year’s presidential election, a surprise move that clears the way for an alternative left-wing candidate.

Anthony Weiner Hit With $65K in Fines for Misusing Past Campaign Funds

Anthony Weiner

Anthony Weiner was slapped with $64,956 in fines by New York City’s Campaign Finance Board on Thursday for using campaign money from his 2013 mayoral bid to pay for personal bills, among other violations, the New York Daily News reported.

Donald Trump’s Team of Outsiders

Donald Trump's Team of Outsiders

Democrats and the media are confused about the meaning of Donald Trump’s pledge to “drain the swamp” in Washington, D.C. The president-elect’s critics say his appointment of wealthy Republicans to cabinet positions is hypocritical and reveals him to be a phony populist. “Hypocrisy at its worst,” cry Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. “Trump’s Economic Cabinet Picks Signal Embrace of Wall St. Elite,” reads the headline on the New York Times. “Stick a sterling silver fork in Trump’s ‘populism,'” reads the title of a Washington Post column.

A Turning Point After All

'Surrender of General Burgoyne' by John Trumbull (1821)

The American Revolution was won on October 17, 1777, when John Burgoyne surrendered his British and German troops in upstate New York after losing a pair of battles—the disastrous ending of the British campaign to drive a line along the Hudson River Valley and thereby isolate radical New England from what they assumed were the more moderate colonies of the central and southern seaboard.

Three Sheets to the Winds of Change

Ray Mabus

On the morning of September 29, 2016, U.S. Navy commands around the world found in their inboxes NAVADMIN 218/16, an unclassified naval message which triumphantly announced Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus’ hard-fought victory over the restless ghost of Josephus Daniels in the battle to assume the ancient title of “Worst. SECNAV. Ever.” Considering Daniels prohibited the use of alcohol aboard U.S. Navy vessels in 1914, this was no small achievement.

Specifically, NAVADMIN 218/16 announced the replacement of so-called “ratings titles”—occupational labels for enlisted Sailors—with alphanumeric occupational codes used in the other armed services. A few of the rating titles, like Boatswain’s Mate and Gunner’s Mate, had been in use prior to the establishment of the U.S. Navy more than two centuries ago. The Navy was now playing fast and loose with history. Sailors and veterans balked.

Reading Homer Today

Rembrandt's 'Homer'

One of the most striking things about the Iliad and the Odyssey is the simultaneous universality and strangeness of the poems’ characters. We understand, for example, Hector and his wife’s need to speak about—and, at times, partly believe in—life after the war and the future of their young son, Astyanax, even though they both know there will be none. In book six, in a brief break from battle, Hector meets Andromache on the city wall, plays with his son briefly, and tells his wife he has no choice between life and death, only between a courageous death and a cowardly one. Still, he asks the gods to allow his son to “rule all Troy in power / and one day let them say, ‘He is a better man than his father!’” Homer ends the poem with Hector’s corpse burning on a funeral pyre, but in most other accounts of the war, Astyanax is thrown from the same wall to his death shortly after the fall of Troy.

Iran Threatens to Walk Away From Nuke Deal, Retaliate Against U.S. for New Sanctions

Ali Khamenei

Iran is threatening to walk away from the nuclear deal with the United States and pursue forms of retaliation, including a national boycott of American goods, as a result of Congress’s overwhelming vote on Thursday to level new sanctions against Iran for another 10 years, according to multiple comments by senior Iranian officials.

Donald Trump’s Team of Outsiders

Donald Trump's Team of Outsiders

Democrats and the media are confused about the meaning of Donald Trump’s pledge to “drain the swamp” in Washington, D.C. The president-elect’s critics say his appointment of wealthy Republicans to cabinet positions is hypocritical and reveals him to be a phony populist. “Hypocrisy at its worst,” cry Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. “Trump’s Economic Cabinet Picks Signal Embrace of Wall St. Elite,” reads the headline on the New York Times. “Stick a sterling silver fork in Trump’s ‘populism,'” reads the title of a Washington Post column.

A Turning Point After All

'Surrender of General Burgoyne' by John Trumbull (1821)

The American Revolution was won on October 17, 1777, when John Burgoyne surrendered his British and German troops in upstate New York after losing a pair of battles—the disastrous ending of the British campaign to drive a line along the Hudson River Valley and thereby isolate radical New England from what they assumed were the more moderate colonies of the central and southern seaboard.

Three Sheets to the Winds of Change

Ray Mabus

On the morning of September 29, 2016, U.S. Navy commands around the world found in their inboxes NAVADMIN 218/16, an unclassified naval message which triumphantly announced Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus’ hard-fought victory over the restless ghost of Josephus Daniels in the battle to assume the ancient title of “Worst. SECNAV. Ever.” Considering Daniels prohibited the use of alcohol aboard U.S. Navy vessels in 1914, this was no small achievement.

Specifically, NAVADMIN 218/16 announced the replacement of so-called “ratings titles”—occupational labels for enlisted Sailors—with alphanumeric occupational codes used in the other armed services. A few of the rating titles, like Boatswain’s Mate and Gunner’s Mate, had been in use prior to the establishment of the U.S. Navy more than two centuries ago. The Navy was now playing fast and loose with history. Sailors and veterans balked.

Reading Homer Today

Rembrandt's 'Homer'

One of the most striking things about the Iliad and the Odyssey is the simultaneous universality and strangeness of the poems’ characters. We understand, for example, Hector and his wife’s need to speak about—and, at times, partly believe in—life after the war and the future of their young son, Astyanax, even though they both know there will be none. In book six, in a brief break from battle, Hector meets Andromache on the city wall, plays with his son briefly, and tells his wife he has no choice between life and death, only between a courageous death and a cowardly one. Still, he asks the gods to allow his son to “rule all Troy in power / and one day let them say, ‘He is a better man than his father!’” Homer ends the poem with Hector’s corpse burning on a funeral pyre, but in most other accounts of the war, Astyanax is thrown from the same wall to his death shortly after the fall of Troy.