AP

AP

Recently, my father, who has worked in technology education for a long time, texted me a picture from an airport restaurant in which he was eating. In the picture, a waiter stood at a table waiting for a family of six to finish looking at their iPads. Each person had bent his or her head to stare at the iPad screen, ignoring one another and the waiter.

Till We Have Faces

Genevieve Valentine (Ellen Wright)

At the core of every science fiction novel is a coherent theory, an implied, but boldfaced assertion of The Way We Will Live Someday. These dynamics make writing books set in the near future particularly difficult, even for the best authors. Predictions being what they are, which is to say nearly always wrong, near-future science fiction must navigate a narrow passage between two fatal hazards. Get too specific, and in a few years your book will take on the characteristic irrelevancy of an old newspaper article. Too broad, and things start to feel generic. Persona, Genevieve Valentine’s third novel, smashes squarely into the latter extreme, and fails as a result.

Ghost of a Chance

China's Harbin (112) guided missile destroyer takes part in the week-long China-Russia "Joint Sea-2014" exercise at the East China Sea off Shanghai in May 2014

Most first novels, it has often been observed, are disguised autobiographies. Only in Washington do you get first novels that are disguised policy briefs.

Ghost Fleet, the work of two D.C. think-tankers taking their first hack at fiction, is an exercise in imagining what a near-future war between China and the United States would be like. It comes complete with an acknowledgements section that opens with the observation, “Writing a book is a team effort” (not the case, I think, for most decent novels) and 22 pages of small-print endnotes.

‘The Stanford Prison Experiment’ Review

Stanford Prison Experiment

As the old saying goes, power corrupts. But absolute power corrupts absolutely, forcing you to make your peers do jumping jacks and pushups when you partake in a study simulating the effects of prison life on college students.

The Stanford Prison Experiment is a dramatic recreation of Philip Zimbardo’s famous 1971 experiment of the same name. Anyone who has taken Psych 101 will likely be familiar with it: Zimbardo took college students, separated them into guards and prisoners, and put them in a “prison” located in one of Stanford University’s buildings.

Iran: Obama Admin Lying About Nuclear Deal for ‘Domestic Consumption’

AP

Senior Iranian officials are accusing the Obama administration of lying about the details of a recently inked nuclear deal in order to soothe fears among U.S. lawmakers and Americans about the implications of the deal, which will release billions of dollars to the Islamic Republic while temporarily freezing its nuclear program, according to regional reports.

Till We Have Faces

Genevieve Valentine (Ellen Wright)

At the core of every science fiction novel is a coherent theory, an implied, but boldfaced assertion of The Way We Will Live Someday. These dynamics make writing books set in the near future particularly difficult, even for the best authors. Predictions being what they are, which is to say nearly always wrong, near-future science fiction must navigate a narrow passage between two fatal hazards. Get too specific, and in a few years your book will take on the characteristic irrelevancy of an old newspaper article. Too broad, and things start to feel generic. Persona, Genevieve Valentine’s third novel, smashes squarely into the latter extreme, and fails as a result.