Islamic Militants Carried Out Attacks on 15 Egyptian Military Positions

An Egyptian military officer watches at a post in Egypt's northern Sinai Peninsula, as seen from the Israel-Egypt border

JERUSALEM—In their most brazen attack yet, Islamic militants in northern Sinai carried out simultaneous attacks Wednesday against 15 Egyptian military positions, killing 64 soldiers and police officers, according to an Egyptian newspaper. Reuters quoted Egyptian military sources as saying that more than 100 attackers were killed, but there has been no confirmation of this figure.

Iran Threatens to Go Nuclear If Talks Fail

Hassan Rouhani

VIENNA—Iranian President Hassan Rouhani hinted this week that Iran would decide to fully pursue its nuclear program in a way “harsher than what they [the United States can] imagine” if Western powers fail to uphold any nuclear agreement expected to be finalized in the coming days.

Clinton Campaign Relocates Planned Fundraiser at Deadbeat Rock Star’s Mansion

AP

The Hillary Clinton campaign had to relocate a fundraiser because the host, Jon Bon Jovi, refused to reimburse his local government for overtime pay racked up by police officers during a 2008 fundraiser for Barack Obama. The campaign relocated a $1,000-per-person fundraiser Monday evening that was originally scheduled to take place at Bon Jovi’s mansion in Middletown, New …

Islamic State Weaves Web of Support in Gulf Arab States

Police cordon off the Imam Sadiq Mosque after a bomb explosion following Friday prayers, in the Al Sawaber area of Kuwait City

KUWAIT/DUBAI (Reuters) – When a Saudi Arabian man flew to Kuwait in the early hours of Friday to carry out the country’s worst militant attack, a bomb vest, Kuwaiti-style Arab robes, a place to prepare, and a car and driver to take him to his target were all lined up for him.

The Spirit of ‘76

Declaration of Independence Signing

On July 4th, 1826, a Washington newspaper published one of the most poignant letters penned in American history. An ailing Thomas Jefferson regretfully declined an invitation to celebrate the 50th anniversary of American independence with the citizens of the nation’s capital. “[T]o be present with them,” he wrote, “as one of the surviving signers of an instrument pregnant with our own, and the fate of the world, is most flattering to myself. . . [I]t adds sensibly to the sufferings of sickness, to be deprived by it of a personal participation in the rejoicings of that day.”

The Detection Club

Agatha Christie

And in those days, a genius arose among the people, and she taught them greatly the ways of … um, well, the writing of mystery novels. However much it was clearly a breakthrough of small but real genius, what Agatha Christie achieved in 1920 with her first book, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, is hard to describe with any precision.

SSA Can’t Collect Overpayments Without Wasting Money

Wikimedia Commons

The Social Security Administration (SSA) spends more money than it collects when trying to recover payments to individuals who received benefits for which they were not eligible.

According to the Office of Inspector General (OIG), the SSA issued $128.3 million in “low-dollar” overpayments between 2008 and 2013, and then spent $323 million to collect them. The agency ultimately recovered only $109.4 million.

Caillebotte’s Paris

'On the Pont de l'Europe' / Wikimedia Commons

What is it about France’s Third Republic—the period between two defeats at the hands of the Germans, the first at Sedan in 1870, and the second everywhere in 1940—that so captivates the American middle class imagination? Of course Americans who yearn to visit Paris one day aren’t necessarily articulating their desires with this historical terminology. But the stereotypes and images of the France they want to see, nine times out of ten, are products of either the Belle Époque and the cleanly Haussmannized 8th Arrondissement, or—for those with a more literary bent—the period after the First World War when Scott and Zelda and their lot took advantage of the weak franc to live it up on the Left Bank.

‘Terminator: Genisys’ Review

Terminator evolution final_2layer

The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards Skynet. That’s my takeaway from five Terminator movies. No matter what we do, no matter how many attempts we make to go through time to stop it, we’re going to wind up with a self-aware computer system that is bent on the destruction of mankind.

The Fax of Life

AP

So she doesn’t know how to use a fax machine. Big whoop. If there is a “smoking gun” in the 3,000 pages of Hillary Clinton emails released by the State Department this week, it’s not in her technological ineptitude, or her calling her hairdresser “Santa,” or her continuing to encourage Sid Blumenthal to offer bad advice, or her fetish for ice tea, or her bizarre demand that John Podesta wear socks to bed. The most revealing dispatch, the one dripping with unintended irony and status detail and sanctimony dressed as social conscience, is the email Lynn Forester de Rothschild, centimillionaire, addressed to Clinton on the morning of August 26, 2009. It is 122 preening and obsequious words long.

Hong Kong’s Democrats Face Uncertain Future

Tents set up by pro-democracy protesters are seen in an occupied area outside government headquarters in Hong Kong's Admiralty district in Hong Kong Tuesday, Nov. 11

Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement is likely to incur more resistance to reforms in the coming years after the recent defeat of a China-backed proposal for restricted elections in the city, analysts say.

Nearly 50,000 people demonstrated in the streets of Hong Kong on Wednesday, the anniversary of the city’s transfer from British to Chinese rule in 1997. Democracy advocates say Beijing has failed to fulfill its promise to Hong Kong of sustaining a “one country, two systems” policy, whereby city residents would enjoy free elections and more civil liberties than the mainland.

The Spirit of ‘76

Declaration of Independence Signing

On July 4th, 1826, a Washington newspaper published one of the most poignant letters penned in American history. An ailing Thomas Jefferson regretfully declined an invitation to celebrate the 50th anniversary of American independence with the citizens of the nation’s capital. “[T]o be present with them,” he wrote, “as one of the surviving signers of an instrument pregnant with our own, and the fate of the world, is most flattering to myself. . . [I]t adds sensibly to the sufferings of sickness, to be deprived by it of a personal participation in the rejoicings of that day.”

The Detection Club

Agatha Christie

And in those days, a genius arose among the people, and she taught them greatly the ways of … um, well, the writing of mystery novels. However much it was clearly a breakthrough of small but real genius, what Agatha Christie achieved in 1920 with her first book, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, is hard to describe with any precision.

SSA Can’t Collect Overpayments Without Wasting Money

Wikimedia Commons

The Social Security Administration (SSA) spends more money than it collects when trying to recover payments to individuals who received benefits for which they were not eligible.

According to the Office of Inspector General (OIG), the SSA issued $128.3 million in “low-dollar” overpayments between 2008 and 2013, and then spent $323 million to collect them. The agency ultimately recovered only $109.4 million.

Caillebotte’s Paris

'On the Pont de l'Europe' / Wikimedia Commons

What is it about France’s Third Republic—the period between two defeats at the hands of the Germans, the first at Sedan in 1870, and the second everywhere in 1940—that so captivates the American middle class imagination? Of course Americans who yearn to visit Paris one day aren’t necessarily articulating their desires with this historical terminology. But the stereotypes and images of the France they want to see, nine times out of ten, are products of either the Belle Époque and the cleanly Haussmannized 8th Arrondissement, or—for those with a more literary bent—the period after the First World War when Scott and Zelda and their lot took advantage of the weak franc to live it up on the Left Bank.

‘Terminator: Genisys’ Review

Terminator evolution final_2layer

The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards Skynet. That’s my takeaway from five Terminator movies. No matter what we do, no matter how many attempts we make to go through time to stop it, we’re going to wind up with a self-aware computer system that is bent on the destruction of mankind.

The Fax of Life

AP

So she doesn’t know how to use a fax machine. Big whoop. If there is a “smoking gun” in the 3,000 pages of Hillary Clinton emails released by the State Department this week, it’s not in her technological ineptitude, or her calling her hairdresser “Santa,” or her continuing to encourage Sid Blumenthal to offer bad advice, or her fetish for ice tea, or her bizarre demand that John Podesta wear socks to bed. The most revealing dispatch, the one dripping with unintended irony and status detail and sanctimony dressed as social conscience, is the email Lynn Forester de Rothschild, centimillionaire, addressed to Clinton on the morning of August 26, 2009. It is 122 preening and obsequious words long.

Hong Kong’s Democrats Face Uncertain Future

Tents set up by pro-democracy protesters are seen in an occupied area outside government headquarters in Hong Kong's Admiralty district in Hong Kong Tuesday, Nov. 11

Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement is likely to incur more resistance to reforms in the coming years after the recent defeat of a China-backed proposal for restricted elections in the city, analysts say.

Nearly 50,000 people demonstrated in the streets of Hong Kong on Wednesday, the anniversary of the city’s transfer from British to Chinese rule in 1997. Democracy advocates say Beijing has failed to fulfill its promise to Hong Kong of sustaining a “one country, two systems” policy, whereby city residents would enjoy free elections and more civil liberties than the mainland.