Donald Trump

AP

Decades of intellectual and political activity preceded the election of Ronald Reagan in 1980. William F. Buckley Jr. founded National Review in 1955. A little less than a decade later, National Review publisher William Rusher helped orchestrate Barry Goldwater’s presidential nomination. The following year, 1965, Buckley ran for mayor of New York City and Irving Kristol, then still a member of the anti-Communist left, founded The Public Interest. The year after that, Reagan was elected governor of California. The 1970s saw the proliferation of the single-issue interest groups that comprised the New Right. The first Conservative Political Action Conference was held in 1973. In 1977, a year after losing the Republican nomination to incumbent Gerald Ford, Reagan addressed the conference.

Editor's Blog

300 Scientists Tell Trump to Leave UN Climate Agreement

Plant Scherer, the nation's largest source of carbon dioxide / AP

Hundreds of scientists told President Trump on Thursday to leave a United Nations climate agreement, arguing that carbon dioxide was “environmentally helpful” and not a “pollutant.”

Guantanamo Detainee Tries to Use Obama Statements That War Is Over to Secure Freedom

Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, Cuba / AP

U.S. District Judge Richard Leon ruled late Wednesday that he would defer to President Trump’s administration to determine whether the United States is still engaged in “active hostilities” against al Qaeda, the Taliban, and their affiliates and has the right to hold prisoners at the Guantanamo Bay military facility.

Count Tessin Went to Paris and All Sweden Got Was This Lousy Museum

Rembrandt's 'Three Thatched Cottages by a Road'

As someone who once went out after dinner as a graduate student and spent my last remaining dollars on a used book, figuring that I could squeeze an advance on my next stipend disbursement out of the college dean the next morning, I get what Count Carl Gustaf Tessin was about. Tessin was a Swedish politician, man of letters, memoirist, and art lover who, following the success of his party in 1738, accepted an appointment as an ambassador to the court of Louis XV. Once in Paris, he embarked on a glorious binge of collection, commissioning, and buying vast numbers of paintings and prints.

Count Tessin Went to Paris and All Sweden Got Was This Lousy Museum

Rembrandt's 'Three Thatched Cottages by a Road'

As someone who once went out after dinner as a graduate student and spent my last remaining dollars on a used book, figuring that I could squeeze an advance on my next stipend disbursement out of the college dean the next morning, I get what Count Carl Gustaf Tessin was about. Tessin was a Swedish politician, man of letters, memoirist, and art lover who, following the success of his party in 1738, accepted an appointment as an ambassador to the court of Louis XV. Once in Paris, he embarked on a glorious binge of collection, commissioning, and buying vast numbers of paintings and prints.

300 Scientists Tell Trump to Leave UN Climate Agreement

Plant Scherer, the nation's largest source of carbon dioxide / AP

Hundreds of scientists told President Trump on Thursday to leave a United Nations climate agreement, arguing that carbon dioxide was “environmentally helpful” and not a “pollutant.”

Guantanamo Detainee Tries to Use Obama Statements That War Is Over to Secure Freedom

Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, Cuba / AP

U.S. District Judge Richard Leon ruled late Wednesday that he would defer to President Trump’s administration to determine whether the United States is still engaged in “active hostilities” against al Qaeda, the Taliban, and their affiliates and has the right to hold prisoners at the Guantanamo Bay military facility.