Moulton (D) Blames Gerrymandering for Abrams’s Georgia Election Loss

Gerrymandering can't affect a statewide race

Seth Moulton
Seth Moulton / Getty Images

Rep. Seth Moulton (D., Mass.) blamed "gerrymandering" for Stacey Abrams's loss last year in the Georgia governor's race, a nonsensical explanation for a statewide defeat.

Moulton, reacting Thursday to the Supreme Court saying decisions on gerrymandering were beyond the scope of federal courts, tweeted the Court's decision was "absurd and un-American."

"Make no mistake: the partisan gerrymandering SCOTUS just allowed is also racial gerrymandering—a modern-day Jim Crow" Moulton wrote. "Just look at what happened with Stacey Abrams last cycle in Georgia."

David Rutz breaks down the most important news about the enemies of freedom, here and around the world, in this comprehensive morning newsletter.

Sign up here and stay informed!

"This is Mitch McConnell’s doing," he went on. "If he cared about his country more than his party, we would have a Supreme Court that actually represents the American people. We need to abolish the filibuster to end his undemocratic hold on our country, & we need @AmyMcGrathKY to beat him."

Abrams refused to officially concede and has complained for months that her election loss was rigged by Republican Brian Kemp, Georgia's former secretary of state, through a variety of voter suppression methods and precinct closings. While those claims are disputed by the facts, Abrams has never blamed her defeat on gerrymandering.

Theoretically, the legislature could draw the most unfair district maps in the country to minimize the impact of the opposition's votes, but in a statewide race, every vote counts the same regardless of from it was cast.

Moulton is one of 25 Democratic 2020 presidential candidates, but he failed to make the stage for the first debates held this week.

He's not alone in expressing sympathy or praise for Abrams, who has not ruled out a presidential campaign herself.

Former Texas congressman Beto O'Rourke called Abrams his "hero," and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D., Mass.) Hillary Clinton, former Attorney General Eric Holder, Sen. Cory Booker (D., N.J.), and others have repeated her claim that the race was stolen from her.