NRA PAC Raises More Than 2.5 Times as Much as Gun-Control PACs in April

NRA haul down from March but still far higher than its opponents

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The National Rifle Association's Political Victory Fund raised about 2.75 times as much money in April as the leading gun-control PACs combined, filings with the Federal Election Commission revealed on Tuesday.

The NRA's total of $1,852,323.28 represents a retreat from the record amount the group raised in March but is still more than the top three gun-control PACs combined. The Giffords PAC raised $653,510.53 in April, the Everytown for Gun Safety PAC raised $16,552.33, and the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence Voter Education Fund raised $4,015.00. The three groups combined raised $674,077.86, which is $1,178,245.42 less than the NRA.

The NRA raised the majority of their money, $1,603,469.65, from small donors who gave less than $200. The other $243,903.58 came from individuals giving more than $200. The group's PAC spent $78,926.50 in April and ended the month with $7,618,245.50 cash on hand.

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Giffords PAC spent more than it raised in April with disbursements of $668,644.29. It ended the month with $5,913,928.54 cash on hand. The Everytown PAC spent just $1,037.73 in April and ended the month with $61,133.47. Brady's PAC spent $468.76 and had $4,454.52.

The NRA PAC's continued dominance in fundraising comes as the gun-control debate continues to dominate the headlines. Republican governors in Florida and Vermont have signed new gun-control laws in the wake of two deadly school shootings this year. Gun-control activists have organized national protests calling for new gun and magazine bans.

The NRA has attempted to counter the push through lawsuits as well as a new membership drive for its 501(c)(4) organization. The gun-rights group said it is nearing 6 million members and recently launched a campaign to enroll 100,000 new members in 100 days.

"The NRA's strength is in our dedicated and politically savvy members," Jason J. Brown, NRA media relations manager, told the Washington Free Beacon about the campaign last month. "Over the next 100 days we hope to welcome 100,000 new freedom-loving Americans to our ranks. The threat to our Second Amendment has never been greater."

The NRA said it does not comment on its fundraising efforts. The group's membership campaign is set to run through the end of July.