Media Outlets Rally Behind ‘Auntie Maxine’ as Millennial Leader

Maxine Waters / Getty Images

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Media outlets have labeled Rep. Maxine Waters (D., Calif.) as the new Democratic leader for millennials to rally behind.

Various publications have been revving up coverage of Waters as a millennial icon after the congresswoman abruptly left a confidential meeting with FBI Director James Comey, claiming he did not have any credibility.

In late January, Elle magazine published an article titled, "Congresswoman Maxine Waters Will Read You Now." The article talks about Waters' impressive "shade"–meaning the ability to underhandedly insult people–calling her "this week's Shade Bae."

"I'm tempted to elect Congresswoman Waters as this week's Shade Bae, but shade is subtle. Waters doesn't have time for subtlety. Waters knows that desperate times call for shadier measures. She is reading this town for filth," Elle says.

Waters has said she identifies with millennials, even saying that she was once a millennial, the Washington Free Beacon reported.

"I was a millennial once. No longer of course, but I love what you're doing," she said, before telling millennials to "stay woke."

Waters was born in 1938, however, which makes her ineligible to be a millennial.

The Huffington Post also reported on Waters as an idol for millennials, writing about how millennials refer to Waters as "Auntie Maxine."

"Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Ca.) has been on a roll during her crusade against President Donald Trump. And her tone, as many social media users noticed, has been quite auntie-like, " the Huffington Post reported, with the following gif at the bottom of the article.

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"Waters has made plenty of headlines before, the past few months have pushed her into the spotlight for millennials and their political discussions, where she's now known, lovingly, as ‘Auntie Maxine,'" the Huffington Post reported.

Mashable held an interview with Waters on Friday regarding her millennial icon status.

Water's belives Millenials are drawn to her by our outspokenness.

"[Millennials] like the outspoken way that I handle dealing with the issues," Waters said. "They like the no-holds-barred confrontation. A lot of young people don't have a lot of faith in politicians. You can't depend on what they say. They talk in circles. They don’t speak the kind of language that has truth to them. I'm speaking differently."

Waters has been quite vocal with her social media accounts, especially on Twitter. Her tweet warning her followers to "get ready for impeachment" has garnered 44,000 retweets and over 100,000 likes.

Waters' Twitter followers increased from 33,000 to 199,000 after abruptly leaving the meeting with Comey.

Madeleine Weast

Madeleine Weast   Email Madeleine | Full Bio | RSS
Madeleine Weast is Assistant Social Media Editor for the Washington Free Beacon. She graduated from the University of Kansas in 2014. Prior to joining the Beacon, she was a Communications Fellow at The Charles Koch Institute. Madeleine is from Prairie Village, Kansas and lives in Washington, D.C. Her Twitter handle is @MadeleineWeast.