O’Rourke Again Compares Trump Administration to Hitler’s Third Reich

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke on Sunday repeated his comparison of the Trump administration to Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler's Third Reich.

"There is so much that is resonant of the Third Reich in this administration. Whether it is attempting to ban all people of one religion and saying that Muslims are somehow inherently dangerous or defective or disqualified," O'Rourke said. "Outside of Nazi Germany, it is hard for me to find another modern democracy that had the audacity to say something like this and then this idea from Goebbels and Hitler that the bigger the lie and the more often you repeat it, the more likely people are to believe it. That is Donald Trump to a tee."

O'Rourke appeared on MSNBC's PoliticsNation, where host Al Sharpton asked him about President Donald Trump reversing his decision to have the G-7 summit at his Florida Doral resort and how he would deal with an "empty five-day cease fire commitment from Turkey."

The former Texas congressman responded by accusing Trump of being inspired by Joseph Goebbels, one of Hitler's most loyal associates, and the propaganda of the Third Reich, saying Trump seems to "employ this tactic that the bigger the lie the more obscene the injustice, the more dizzying the pace of this bizarre behavior, the less likely we are to do something about it."

Sharpton followed up to ask O'Rourke whether he heard him correctly that he compared Trump to the Third Reich.

O'Rourke then listed off Trump administration policies similar to the Third Reich, including family separation and Trump's comments after the Charlottesville protests.

"Alright, you clearly said it's the Third Reich," Sharpton said before switching to another topic.

This isn't the first time O'Rourke has compared the Trump administration to the Third Reich. Earlier in the week, O'Rourke spoke at an event where he repeated the same talking points.

"It is hard outside of the Third Reich to find another example in modern human history of a leader, of a modern democracy saying that one people of one religion are inherently dangerous or disqualified or defective and yet that's what our president did," O'Rourke said.

He also made the comparison back in April.