Clinton Refuses to Say ‘Radical Islam’ at Debate, Said ‘Radical Islamic Jihadist Groups’ Four Days Prior

Hillary Clinton refused to use the term "radical Islam" to describe groups like the Islamic State Saturday at the Democratic debate, despite having used the term "radical Islamic jihadist groups" four days prior.

When moderator John Dickerson asked Clinton whether she agreed with Sen. Marco Rubio’s (R., Fla.) statement that the Paris attacks show "that we are at war with Radical Islam," Clinton said she would use a term other than "Radical Islam."

"I don’t think we’re at war with Islam," she said Saturday. "I don’t think we’re at war with all Muslims. I think we’re at war with jihadists."

"He didn’t say all Muslims," Dickerson said. "He said, ‘Radical Islam.’ Is that a phrase you don’t [use]?"

"I think you can talk about Islamists who clearly are also jihadists," she said. "But I think it’s not particularly helpful."

At an event in New Hampshire four days earlier, Clinton said, "I do think that we have to do a better job of understanding the threat that is posed by radical Islamic jihadist groups."

At the debate, Clinton went on to praise President George W. Bush for saying that America is not at war with Islam or Muslims, but with violent extremism.

"Yes, we are at war with those people," she said. "But I don't want us to be painting with too broad a brush."

President Obama, who Clinton took a shot at earlier in the debate, has also refused to use the term radical Islam.

"They are not religious leaders; they are terrorists," he said in February. "We are not at war with Islam. We are at war with people who have perverted Islam."