Landrieu Criticizes Obamacare Cancellations, Introduces ‘Keeping the Promise Act’

Cancellation letters 'never should have gone out'

Sen. Mary Landrieu (D., La.) took to the Senate floor Monday night to introduce her "Keeping the Promise Act", a measure that seeks to redefine the "grandfather clause" found in Obamacare to prevent American citizens from receiving cancellation notices of their health insurance policies.

Landrieu read a letter addressed to one of her constituents that stated her policy had been canceled due to the new restrictions included in Obama's health law, saying that such letters "never should have gone out" because of the promise that the President and Democratic lawmakers repeatedly made in trying to pass the bill:

MARY LANDRIEU: So this is a letter that thousands of people are getting and this letter never should have gone out because we said to people if you had insurance that you like, you could keep it. We didn't say if you had insurance that you like that didn't meet the minimum standards or met the minimum standards, you could keep it. We just said and the president said over and over if you have insurance and you like the insurance you have, you can keep it. That is what my bill — that's the single focus of my bill.

Landrieu voted for Obamacare’s passage in March 2010. Later that year, Sen. Mike Enzi (R., Wyo.) introduced legislation that would safeguard many businesses from losing their health plans under Obamacare’s grandfather clause. Landrieu voted against the measure.

Her bill comes amid widespread criticism over President Obama’s false promise that if individuals "like their plan, they can keep it" and Obamacare would not affect them. Millions of Americans have received cancellation notices in recent weeks.

Sen. Ron Johnson (R., Wis.) has already introduced legislation that protects individuals against losing their existing health coverage, the "If You Like Your Plan, You Can Keep It Act". Landrieu has not yet expressed support of Johnson's bill.

Landrieu is up for reelection in 2014.