Domino’s Customers Call Obamacare Reg ‘Obnoxious, Costly, Annoying’

Most customers don't use menu to order from 34 million order possibilities

/ AP

Domino’s continues to push back against a regulation mandated by the president’s health care law, releasing a new video that shows their customers calling the calorie posting rule "obnoxious" and "annoying."

The pizza chain has aggressively fought against the rule, which originated in Obamacare and requires every menu board in a restaurant to list the calories for every menu item, calling the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) policy "impossible to comply."

The company argues that posting the calories for their 34 million different menu combinations is not beneficial to consumers, the majority of whom order by phone or online, never looking at a menu.

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In the new video, Domino’s shows one store that received 324 orders in one day. Only five orders were placed after looking at the menu in the store, or 1.5 percent.

Menu Labeling from Menu Labeling on Vimeo.

"Calorie counts and solutions to help educate customers are important," a narrator in the video says. "In fact we want you to know that information and that is why we already provide it on our website, and we’ve been doing so for over a decade."

"The government would like us to have this information available on boards in the store," a representative for Domino’s tells a customer in the video.

"There’s no way that that would be possible," a customer replies. "That would be obnoxious, costly… annoying."

"Crazy, I think," said another.

Domino’s also put up a dozen menu boards at the entrance of the store, showing what it would look like if their restaurants complied with the standards, listing every single pizza, sauce, crust, topping, and menu item possible.

The menu overwhelmed customers.

"I’m totally confused and lost," one said.

A bipartisan bill introduced in the House by Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R., Wash.) would give businesses more flexibility in complying with the calorie rule, and allow restaurants that primarily rely on carry out orders to display their calories online.