The People vs. Harry Reid

Voters reject Democratic obstructionism on immigration
Old millionaire is out of touch. (AP)

Congress is working on a legislative solution to the immigrant children crisis on the southern border, which the Obama administration now admits they had anticipated back in January yet still did nothing to stop it.

As the Huffington Post reports,  a 2008 anti-trafficking law, which many say has exacerbated the crisis, is at the center of the debate:

The law requires unaccompanied minors from countries other than Canada and Mexico to go through a hearing process to determine if they are eligible to remain in the U.S. through asylum or other relief. But the 57,000 unaccompanied minors who have illegally crossed the U.S.-Mexico border since October have overwhelmed the system, making the 2008 law seem unsustainable to many.

Republicans say the 2008 law must be changed as a condition of approving any funding for the crisis. Most Democrats say it should be left as is.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D., Nev.), for example, who opposes a bipartisan bill that would reform the law, and make it easier for the U.S. to return non-Mexican immigrants to their countries of origin. He has dismissed the legislation, sponsored by Senator John Cornyn (R., Texas) and Representative Henry Cuellar (D., Texas), as another “crazy idea” from House Republicans. Reid has yet to produce legislation of his own to solve the problem.

U.S. Lawmakers Have Reduced Security Assistance to Central America

Restrictions fueling current immigration problems at U.S. border
A temporary shelter for unaccompanied minors who have entered the country illegally is seen at Lackland Air Force Base

U.S. lawmakers have reduced security assistance to Central American countries that have become increasingly violent in recent months, in part fueling the current immigration problems at the U.S. border, experts and military commanders say.

Lib Language Police: ‘Illegal’ Is The New ‘N-Word’

Detainees sleep and watch television in a holding cell where hundreds of mostly Central American immigrant children are being processed and held at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center

CNN’s Sally Kohn says using the term “illegal” to describe anyone who enters or stays in America illegally is tantamount to employing a racial slur like the “n-word” or the “f-word” as a disparaging term for a homosexual man.

You could see this one coming a mile away. As the border crisis grows and politicians, pundits, and media personalities debate and discuss the problem of the 50,000+ unaccompanied alien children who’ve illegally entered our country over the past several months, leave it to liberal commentators to focus their arguments on the appropriate politically correct euphemisms used to identify the children.