Clinton Campaign Alumni Flip Out Over Romney Senate Rumors, Demand He Take Up Knitting

Hillary Clinton / Getty Images

BY:

Hillary Clinton campaign alumni and other liberals furiously took to Twitter on Tuesday to vent their frustrations with the idea that Mitt Romney could run for the Senate in Utah, saying he should take up "knitting" instead.

With Sen. Orrin Hatch (R., Utah) announcing Tuesday that he will retire at the end of his current term, speculation began anew about whether Romney, the last major-party nominee to lose a presidential election before Clinton in 2016, would run for the seat this year.

Reports that Romney could run for Hatch's seat if he decided to retire in 2018 have floated for months. Romney, a Republican, is popular in Utah and carried the red state easily when he ran for president in 2012.

Nevertheless, Clinton alumni and boosters—like former press secretary Brian Fallon, Nick Morrow, and Eric Boehlert—decried what they viewed as a double standard for Clinton and Romney.

Fallon wrote that Romney should focus on knitting rather than politics, referencing a Vanity Fair video last month in which writers jokingly offered New Year's resolutions for Clinton, including one female writer who suggested she could take up knitting.

Though it was part of a series of videos mocking other politicians and Vanity Fair is an openly left-leaning publication, Clinton backers and other liberals ripped the joke as sexist, and the magazine subsequently apologized.

Morrow also criticized what he described as a double standard for Clinton and Romney, decrying the knitting joke and joining a list of several Clinton backers who gave their thoughts on the 2012 GOP nominee possibly reentering the political arena.

×
THE MORNING BEACON DAILY NEWSLETTER
MAKES IT EASIER TO STAY INFORMED
Get the news that matters most to you, delivered straight to your inbox daily.

Register today!
  • Grow your email list exponentially
  • Dramatically increase your conversion rates
  • Engage more with your audience
  • Boost your current and future profits