Missing Libyan Jetliners Raise Fears of Suicide Airliner Attacks on 9/11

In this image made from video by The Associated Press, smoke rises from the direction of Tripoli airport in Tripoli, Libya, Sunday, July 13, 2014. Rival militias battled Sunday for the control of the international airport in Libya's capital

Islamist militias in Libya took control of nearly a dozen commercial jetliners last month, and western intelligence agencies recently issued a warning that the jets could be used in terrorist attacks across North Africa.

Intelligence reports of the stolen jetliners were distributed within the U.S. government over the past two weeks and included a warning that one or more of the aircraft could be used in an attack later this month on the date marking the anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks against New York and Washington, said U.S. officials familiar with the reports.

While Libya Burns, U.S. Ambassador Goes Yacht Watching on a Beach in Malta

U.S. Ambassador to Libya Safira Deborah. (Twitter)

The situation in Libya continues to deteriorate. Islamic terrorists have reportedly seized control of the airport in Tripoli after days of heavy fighting, while Egypt and the United Arab Emirates have launched a series of secret air strikes on militant positions, according to U.S. officials. U.S. ambassador to Libya Safira Deborah has fled the country.

On Monday, Deborah wrote on Twitter that she was “still” in the island nation of Malta, a popular tourist destination known for its sunny beaches. She included a photo as proof: