Bush the Elder

George H.W. Bush

In The Quiet Man, John Sununu, former governor of New Hampshire, writes affectionately of the presidency of George HW Bush. As Bush’s chief of staff, Sununu was with the president for all of the significant moments of his consequential term in office. Though admittedly biased, this assessment of Mr. Bush’s record is made worthwhile by the new details it brings to old stories.

The Spirit of ‘76

On July 4th, 1826, a Washington newspaper published one of the most poignant letters penned in American history. An ailing Thomas Jefferson regretfully declined an invitation to celebrate the 50th anniversary of American independence with the citizens of the nation’s capital. “[T]o be present with them,” he wrote, “as one of the surviving signers of an instrument pregnant with our own, and the fate of the world, is most flattering to myself. . . [I]t adds sensibly to the sufferings of sickness, to be deprived by it of a personal participation in the rejoicings of that day.”

The Detection Club

And in those days, a genius arose among the people, and she taught them greatly the ways of … um, well, the writing of mystery novels. However much it was clearly a breakthrough of small but real genius, what Agatha Christie achieved in 1920 with her first book, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, is hard to describe with any precision.