Sherman to Reintroduce Articles of Impeachment

Reps. Nancy Pelosi and Brad Sherman (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

A California congressman intends to introduce articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump on Thursday, the first day Democrats take control of the House in the new Congress.

Rep. Brad Sherman (D., Calif.) said impeachment would be in the national interest, the Los Angeles Times reported Thursday. "There is no reason it shouldn’t be before the Congress," Sherman said. "Every day, Donald Trump shows that leaving the White House would be good for our country."

Sherman previously pressed for Trump's impeachment in July 2017. He argued Trump's alleged interference and motives for firing James Comey provided "clear and convincing" evidence of obstruction.

"As the investigations move forward, additional evidence supporting additional Articles of Impeachment may emerge," Sherman said at the time. "However, as to Obstruction of Justice, as defined in 18 U.S.C. § 1512 (b)(3), the evidence we have is sufficient to move forward now.  And the national interest requires that we do so."

In 2017, 60 Democrats voted for impeachment, far short of the required majority. With the advent of the 116th Congress, however, Democrats regain the majority and control of the gavel in the House of Representatives.

Incoming Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D., Calif.) has cautioned against premature impeachment efforts, preferring to wait for an end to special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

Nevertheless, Sherman intends to press the matter without delay. "Every member of the House will have to address [the issue] whether there are formal articles of impeachment pending," he said.

Though Republicans lost dozens of seats in the House, they grew their majority in the Senate. A Senate conviction, should the House vote to impeach, would require 67 votes.

Despite the agitation for his impeachment, Trump has expressed confidence in his presidency. In a December interview with Reuters, Trump maintained his innocence and pointed to his track record. "It’s hard to impeach somebody who hasn’t done anything wrong and who’s created the greatest economy in the history of our country," he said.