Schiff: ‘Most of’ the Criticism of George Soros Is Because of His Jewish Faith

Rep. Adam Schiff (D., Calif.) appeared on CNN's "State of the Union" with Jake Tapper on Sunday to discuss the mass shooting at a synagogue in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and Republican criticisms of "billionaire financier" and Democratic donor George Soros. Schiff said that he believes "most of" the criticism of Soros is anti-Semitic, including the theory that Soros is funding the caravan approaching the United States from the southern border.

"George Soros is a billionaire financier. Someone in the political arena that opens themselves up to criticism. Do you think all the criticism coming from the right about George Soros, all of it, is anti-Semitic? Some of it? How do you view it?" Tapper asked.

"I don't know if I can say all of it," Schiff responded. "Some may have an issue with his Open Society Organization or foundation. But I think much of it, most of it," he continued before being cut off by the beginning of the Pittsburgh press conference on the shooting.

On Saturday an armed gunman went on a shooting rampage at the Tree of Life synagogue, where he killed 11 people and injured several others. According to a federal law enforcement official, he made anti-semitic statements during the shooting and targeted Jews on social media.

When the press conference ended, Tapper once again brought Schiff back to the topic of George Soros.

"These attacks by Soros are driven largely by his Jewish faith," Schiff said. "The fact that he's become a symbol is not an accident."

"The fact that they're promulgating this falsehood that he's funding the caravan is an effort to give rebirth to this blood libel," Schiff continued.

Last week, Soros received a suspicious package that contained an explosive device. Several other high profile Democrats or critics of President Donald Trump received similar suspicious packages. Law enforcement apprehended the individual on Friday, accused of sending the packages.

Schiff then turned to the Trump administration, saying "You do see people from the president downplaying this. Candidates around the country playing on this….The explosion of antisemitism doesn't happen on it's own. "

"These are still a minority of repugnant voices," Schiff said in conclusion. "They have to be drowned out by our common goodness."