Abrams Ties Low Unemployment in Georgia to People Working ‘Multiple Jobs’

Democrat Stacey Abrams suggested Wednesday that low unemployment numbers in Georgia were tied to citizens having multiple jobs, a fact that would not affect the unemployment rate.

"We can't confuse low unemployment with a good economy, because unfortunately too many Georgians have multiple jobs," she told 11Alive News ahead of the Democratic debate in Atlanta. "That's why unemployment is low for some of them. They have too many jobs, and they can't make a living with one job."

"Democrats understand that we have to do more than just put a nice face on the economy," she added. "We've got to put real people to work and make certain they can make a living as well as make a life, and that's what Democrats are going to fight for."

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Abrams's remarks were similar to those made last year by Democratic congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.). The then-candidate told PBS that the U.S. unemployment rate was low because "everyone has two jobs." Ocasio-Cortez's claim earned a "Pants On Fire" rating from fact-checking site PolitiFact, which noted that less than 5 percent of Americans work two jobs.

The unemployment rate in Georgia tied an all-time low last month at 3.4 percent. The national rate is 3.6 percent.

During the interview, Abrams reiterated that she would be honored to be the running mate of whoever wins the Democratic nomination if asked. She also touted the holding of a Democratic debate in Georgia before primary voting as proof it has become a swing state.

Republicans have carried Georgia in six consecutive presidential elections.

Abrams has become a Democratic star since her narrow loss to Republican Brian Kemp in last year's governor's race, which she famously refused to concede. She has decided against runs for the White House and Senate, and has focused on her voters' rights campaign since her defeat.