Abrams: Semi-Automatic Weapons Have to Be Put Under a Certain Level of Responsible Control

Democratic candidate for Georgia governor Stacey Abrams said on Sunday that semi-automatic weapons have to be put under a "certain level of responsible control."

"Semi-automatic weapons have to be put under a certain level of responsible control. And I believe that as the next governor of Georgia, I can work with Democrats and Republicans to come up with common sense gun safety legislation that allow us to make our families and our communities safer," Abrams told CNN anchor Jake Tapper.

In recent days, Abrams expressed support for banning AR-15s and implementing stricter gun control laws.

David Rutz breaks down the most important news about the enemies of freedom, here and around the world, in this comprehensive morning newsletter.

Sign up here and stay informed!

Tapper brought up a bill she sponsored as a state lawmaker that would allow state officials confiscate assault weapons from law-abiding citizens.

"When you were a state lawmaker in 2016, you co-sponsored a bill that would have allowed Georgia state authorities to take away so-called assault weapons from current gun owners. Most similar bans would grandfather in existing weapons of that sort. Semi-automatic rifles that are called assault weapons. So is that your current position, that law-abiding gun owners in Georgia should have to give up those weapons, if authorities deem it necessary?" Tapper asked.

"In the state of Georgia, you introduce legislation to start conversations," Abrams said. "I am happy to work with the legislature to figure out how we make an assault weapons ban work. But what I fundamentally believe is that we have to have common sense gun safety legislation."

Tapper followed up to see if Abrams was still in favor of confiscation.

"Your cosponsor told reporters that the law, quote, would require gun owners of these particular models to turn their guns in," Tapper said.

"And again, my point is this. The legislation introduced was the beginning of a conversation. I am absolutely certain that were we to pass this in Georgia, we would have a conversation about grandfathering in, about whether or not people would turn their guns in, whether there would be buybacks," Abrams said. "There are a number of approaches to take to accomplish this goal, but the fundamental responsibility is common sense gun safety legislation in Georgia."

"So you don't support the actual legislation, you just support having a conversation about it?" Tapper asked to clarify.

"No, what I've said is, legislation in the state legislature is about starting the conversation. Very few pieces of the legislation are introduced and come out the same way they go that's the process of making the law," Abrams said.