How Far Does $100 Go in Your State?

Washington, D.C., ranks last for purchasing power

BY:

A one-hundred dollar bill is worth less in Washington, D.C., where it is estimated to have the purchasing power of only $84.96, than in any state in the nation, the Tax Foundation reports.

"The same amount of cash can buy you comparatively more in a low-price state than in a high-price state," the report says.

The states where $100 go the farthest are Mississippi ($115.21), Arkansas ($114.29), South Dakota ($114.16), Alabama ($114.03) and West Virginia ($113.12).

A one-hundred dollar bill is worth the least in the District of Columbia ($84.96), Hawaii ($86.06), New York ($86.73), New Jersey ($87.34) and California ($89.05).

"Regional price differences are strikingly large; real purchasing power is 36 percent greater in Mississippi than it is in the District of Columbia," says the Tax Foundation. "In other words: by this measure, if you have $50,000 in after tax income in Mississippi, you would have to have after-tax earnings of $68,000 in the District of Columbia just to afford the same overall standard of living."

Ali Meyer

Ali Meyer   Email Ali | Full Bio | RSS
Ali Meyer is a staff writer with the Washington Free Beacon covering economic issues that expose government waste, fraud, and abuse. Prior to the Free Beacon, she was a multimedia reporter with CNSNews.com where her work appeared on outlets such as Drudge Report and Fox News. She also interned with the Heritage Foundation and Pacific Research Institute. Her Twitter handle is @DJAliMeyer, and her email address is meyer@freebeacon.com.

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