US soldiers take part in a massive amphibious landing

U.S. soldiers take part in a massive amphibious landing / Getty Images

There are at least two problems with the military shifting its focus toward great-power war against Eurasia’s two giants at the expense of its capabilities to conduct irregular warfare in the Middle East. First, it seems that, realistically, the next war in which the U.S. is engaged is much more likely to be irregular and involve terrorists and insurgents in Africa or the Middle East, rather than, say, a war with China over Taiwan. Second, regardless of what objective analysis shows to be the most sound, effective defense strategy for the U.S., the political reality in Washington is that the Middle East always seems to dominate the headlines, and lawmakers can never seem to make the strategic shift away from the region.

Biden Flips, Now Supports Repealing Hyde Amendment

Joe Biden

Former vice president Joe Biden now supports repealing the Hyde Amendment, which prohibits federal funding of abortion except in cases of rape, incest, or when the mother’s life is endangered.

Sanders: ‘I Did My Best’ to Stop U.S. Foreign Policy in the 1980s

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I., Vt.) defended his Reagan-era affinity to left-wing regimes in an interview with the New York Times last week, saying that he “did his best” to oppose the anti-communist foreign policy stances of the United States.

Arson Suspected in Three Fires At Jewish Centers

Israel flag burning

Fires at Jewish centers in Massachusetts were deliberately set, authorities now believe. Two were an hour apart, and two struck one house the same week.

Omar Calls for Abolishing ICE, Stopping Deportations

Rep. Ilhan Omar (D., Minn.) called for abolishing Immigration and Customs Enforcement and halting deportations while delivering remarks on Thursday after President Donald Trump offered a new immigration plan.

Hickenlooper National Security Policy Avoids Energy Revolution

John Hickenlooper’s rollout of a national security plan called for climate change to be treated as a security issue, but the presidential candidate has avoided the topic of the recent U.S. energy production boom, which he cited in 2015 as heralding a new era of safety and stability to liberal democracies that value freedom.

Trump Admin Kicks Off Plan to Foster Israeli-Palestinian Peace

Steve Mnuchin, Donald Trump, Jared Kushner

The Trump administration has started to implement its multi-faceted plan to foster peace between Israel and the Palestinians, a process that will begin in June when Bahrain hosts a forum to promote economic development in key Palestinian territories, according to senior administration officials.

The Trump administration’s long rumored peace plan is just beginning to spill into public view, with senior officials organizing a June 25 business forum in Bahrain that will bring together a range of political and business officials in the region to develop methods to spur growth in the Palestinian economy.

Its Own Worst Enemy

Freedom of the press is under attack, and President Donald Trump is to blame. So goes the media narrative.

Mark Levin accepts the premise that freedom of the press is at risk, but places the locus of blame on the media itself. His new book Unfreedom of the Press takes the media to task for “destroying freedom of the press from within.”

None the Wiser

It’s clear that Tim Blake Nelson sincerely loves Socrates.

You may know Nelson as an actor from his turns in Coen Brothers works like the impossibly sympathetic and goofy Delmar in O Brother Where Art Thou, freaking out about his buddy being turned into a frog. Or, more recently, you may have seen him as the cheery and violent gunslinging “songbird” Buster Scruggs on Netflix. Now he’s written a play, Socrates, currently running at the Public Theater in New York, about the second-most salient self-sacrifice in human history. It’s poignantly set and incredibly cast, conjuring a world of Plato and Aristotle and Aristophanes that’s engrossing. It’s full of love, and it’s full of rage.

Real Americans

When I walked into the “Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing” exhibit at the Frist Art Museum in Nashville, I entered a pristinely curated history book. The black-and-white photographs hanging neatly on the walls provide the museum’s visitors with an account of history by the people who lived it. There are ex-slaves and their children still working in fields under direction of white plantation owners, with dusty faces gnarled from sun; migrant workers in the Dust Bowl whose hands are sun-burnt and calloused from field work, standing by their underfed children; somnolent stares from across a segregated taproom; and wet eyes of Americans entering internment camps at the dawn of the Second World War.

Warren Zevon: A Genius and Disaster

There aren’t actually all that many lines in pop music that tell you, simply by their construction, who their writer was. And a man named Warren Zevon had a surprising number of them. You hear something like, I saw a werewolf with a Chinese menu in his hand / Walking through the streets of Soho in the rain, as he sang in his 1978 “Werewolves of London.” And you know it has to be him. Only him. The genius and the disaster that was Warren Zevon.

Peace Fever

Iran deal

Whatever the opposite of a rush to war is—a crawl to peace, maybe—America is in the middle of one. Since May 5, when John Bolton announced the accelerated deployment of the Abraham Lincoln carrier group to the Persian Gulf in response to intelligence of a possible Iranian attack, the press has been aflame with calls for America to show restraint, pursue diplomacy, and rein in the madman with the moustache before he starts a war.

Biden Flips, Now Supports Repealing Hyde Amendment

Joe Biden

Former vice president Joe Biden now supports repealing the Hyde Amendment, which prohibits federal funding of abortion except in cases of rape, incest, or when the mother’s life is endangered.

Hickenlooper National Security Policy Avoids Energy Revolution

John Hickenlooper’s rollout of a national security plan called for climate change to be treated as a security issue, but the presidential candidate has avoided the topic of the recent U.S. energy production boom, which he cited in 2015 as heralding a new era of safety and stability to liberal democracies that value freedom.

Sanders: ‘I Did My Best’ to Stop U.S. Foreign Policy in the 1980s

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I., Vt.) defended his Reagan-era affinity to left-wing regimes in an interview with the New York Times last week, saying that he “did his best” to oppose the anti-communist foreign policy stances of the United States.

Trump Admin Kicks Off Plan to Foster Israeli-Palestinian Peace

Steve Mnuchin, Donald Trump, Jared Kushner

The Trump administration has started to implement its multi-faceted plan to foster peace between Israel and the Palestinians, a process that will begin in June when Bahrain hosts a forum to promote economic development in key Palestinian territories, according to senior administration officials.

The Trump administration’s long rumored peace plan is just beginning to spill into public view, with senior officials organizing a June 25 business forum in Bahrain that will bring together a range of political and business officials in the region to develop methods to spur growth in the Palestinian economy.

Its Own Worst Enemy

Freedom of the press is under attack, and President Donald Trump is to blame. So goes the media narrative.

Mark Levin accepts the premise that freedom of the press is at risk, but places the locus of blame on the media itself. His new book Unfreedom of the Press takes the media to task for “destroying freedom of the press from within.”

None the Wiser

It’s clear that Tim Blake Nelson sincerely loves Socrates.

You may know Nelson as an actor from his turns in Coen Brothers works like the impossibly sympathetic and goofy Delmar in O Brother Where Art Thou, freaking out about his buddy being turned into a frog. Or, more recently, you may have seen him as the cheery and violent gunslinging “songbird” Buster Scruggs on Netflix. Now he’s written a play, Socrates, currently running at the Public Theater in New York, about the second-most salient self-sacrifice in human history. It’s poignantly set and incredibly cast, conjuring a world of Plato and Aristotle and Aristophanes that’s engrossing. It’s full of love, and it’s full of rage.

Real Americans

When I walked into the “Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing” exhibit at the Frist Art Museum in Nashville, I entered a pristinely curated history book. The black-and-white photographs hanging neatly on the walls provide the museum’s visitors with an account of history by the people who lived it. There are ex-slaves and their children still working in fields under direction of white plantation owners, with dusty faces gnarled from sun; migrant workers in the Dust Bowl whose hands are sun-burnt and calloused from field work, standing by their underfed children; somnolent stares from across a segregated taproom; and wet eyes of Americans entering internment camps at the dawn of the Second World War.