Clyburn: I Don’t Think There’s Any ‘Comeback’ for Trump

Rep. James Clyburn (D., S.C.) said President Donald Trump has "marginalized himself" and there may be no "comeback for him" during an interview Wednesday on MSNBC.

In the wake of Trump's criticized comments on last weekend's violence in Charlottesville, Va., Clyburn said there is a "total disaster in the executive branch."

Clyburn framed his criticism in terms of a bipartisan effort to reform the tax code, overhaul infrastructure, and produce economic growth. He said that Trump has not been a leader on those issues and called for stronger congressional action.

"Let's do something about infrastructure," Clyburn said. "Let's do something about what I like to call a fair tax bill. Not a tax bill that's going to give unusually high breaks to upper-income people, but a tax code that would be fair to everybody, that would be pro-growth for business and pro-growth for America's families. We can do that."

"It's been done before, and so let's just work together in a bipartisan way and get that done, because this president has marginalized himself in such a way that I don't think there is any comeback for him," Clyburn added. "There is no way that he is going to be able to revive himself and be of any real good going forward."

Clyburn also said that Congress should do more to overcome the "disaster" of the executive branch under Trump.

"We have three co-equal branches of government and everybody can see on yesterday that there is a total disaster in the executive branch," Clyburn said. "But the Congress is representative of the people … We call ourselves all the time the people's House. It is time for us to step up and demonstrate that we are in fact the people's House."

Clyburn signaled his willingness to work directly with Republican leadership and he even praised Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R., Wis.).

"I know Speaker Ryan," Clyburn said. "I like him a whole lot. We have worked together."

"We can have an infrastructure bill that put this formula in place so low-income communities can be a part of this significant recovery that's doing good for Wall Street," Clyburn added.