To Look, to See, to Finally Feel

art

Let’s face it, most books that come along with art exhibits usually are too academically strenuous and boring for laymen. A lot of people buy them for the pictures. But Katie Hanson’s Klimt and Schiele Drawings, a companion guide to a just-concluded exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, breaks the mold. Hanson, the assistant curator of Paintings and Art of Europe at the MFA, writes with style, simplicity, and—even more rare—a goal for her readers. She wants you to learn how to admire and experience art the way Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele hoped we would.

American Power Under Siege

In 1991, after the Soviet Union collapsed, the United States gained unchallenged supremacy in the world. Indeed, just three years later, the U.S. alone accounted for about 25 percent of global GDP and 40 percent of world military spending, while Washington’s treaty allies in Europe and the Asia Pacific boasted roughly another 47 and 35 percent, respectively. Potential adversaries, meanwhile, were weak and overmatched: Russia was reeling from the Soviet implosion; China did not have the economic or military weight to compete; Iran was still recovering from its calamitous war with Iraq. In this environment, the U.S. could act with impunity. Democracy was expanding across the globe; the long shadow of communist authoritarianism had disappeared. It was the end of history as we knew it. Or so many thought.

Defying the Dogmas of Modern Feminism

Women are in a bind. The sexual revolution has loosened sexual standards to such an extent that the less-easily-attained joys of committed relationships are increasingly out of reach, reducing women’s life satisfaction even as sexual freedom is hailed as their salvation. In Sex Matters: How Modern Feminism Lost Touch with Science, Love, and Common Sense, conservative author Mona Charen bluntly argues that this shift toward shallow relationships is tailored to the male libido: