Sept. 25: Obama Refused to Describe Benghazi Attack as Terrorism

Tells The View: 'We are still doing an investigation'


Two weeks after a coordinated attack in Benghazi, Libya that killed four Americans, including the U.S. ambassador, President Barack Obama refused to describe it as terrorism, despite the fact that Secretary of State Hillary Clinton had already done so.

“As we all know, the United States lost a great ambassador and the Libyan people lost a true friend when Chris Stevens and three other Americans were killed in the terrorist assault on our consulate in Benghazi,” Clinton said on Sept. 24.

On Sept. 25, however, Obama declined to called the attack an act of terrorism when asked directly on ABC’s The View.

“We are still doing an investigation,” he said when asked if the Benghazi attack was an act of terrorism. “There is no doubt that the kind of weapons that were used, the ongoing assault, that it wasn’t just a mob action. Now, we don’t have all the information yet so we are still gathering.”

In a speech to the United Nations General Assembly delivered the same day, Obama did not once use the word terrorism in reference to Libya.