God Bless These Heroes of the Ebola Crisis

The entire world, but more importantly America, is in the midst of an Ebola outbreak that could threat the existence of life on Earth as we know it. Things are looking pretty grim for humanity, and President Obama’s failure to lead has made things even worse.

If we are to survive the epidemic, we are going to need heroes. Several individuals and conglomerates have, in Obama’s absence, already stepped up to the plate and, through their selfless actions, given us hope. It’s worth recognizing those heroes now, before it’s too late.

Ebola Czar Vanishes from Democracy Alliance Website

Health workers wearing protective gear wait to carry the body of a person suspected to have died from Ebola, in Monrovia, Liberia

Third Way, a progressive think tank with ties to the Democracy Alliance, has removed newly appointed Ebola czar Ron Klain from its website, following a Washington Free Beacon report.

The Free Beacon reported Friday on Klain’s status as a trustee for Third Way, and his past experience lobbying on behalf of a drug company that was accused of denying life-saving drugs to dying cancer patients.

Ebola v. Obesity: The Politicized NIH

For over a year, the Washington Free Beacon’s Elizabeth Harrington has been documenting research grants provided by the National Institutes of Health to recipients like an obvious conman who said he wanted to bring origami condoms to the world ($2.5 million) and teams studying if obese people could be persuaded to lose weight by having the government text message them ($2.7 million). Last week, with the NIH’s budget in the spotlight—courtesy of the director of the NIH himself, Dr. Francis Collins, who claimed that an Ebola vaccine would likely exist today were it not for a “10-year-slide in research support” for his organization—Harrington wrote a round-up of her work on this issue, observing that the total amount of absurd NIH funding she had chronicled amounted to nearly $40 million, all of which would obviously have been better spent on an Ebola vaccine—or on cancer, or on HIV/AIDS, or on any number of worthy medical causes.