Scarborough: ‘Identity Politics Will Be the Undoing of Democrats in 2020 if Not 2018’

MSNBC host Joe Scarborough said Tuesday that the Democratic Party lack a "unifying message" because it emphasizes identity politics, which he argued "will be the undoing of Democrats in 2020 if not 2018."

Scarborough first noted that the party not in the White House generally performs well in midterm elections even if the economy is in good shape. He added, however, that Democrats are their own biggest obstacles to gaining big victories in the 2018 elections.

"I'm talking to more and more Democratic leaders, Democratic policy people who are concerned that the Democrats have everything on their side but they don't have a unifying message," Scarborough said. "A lot of people that were concerned that Hillary Clinton was going to lose [in 2016] in the Democratic Party are saying still they still don't have a message for the common good."

Scarborough said the Democratic Party has different messages tailored for various groups saying they have been mistreated and "this is what we're going to do to take care of you," adding that the party "balkanizes voters."

The "Morning Joe" host went on to criticize Democrats for intra-party fighting, expressing disbelief that Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D., Calif.) is not liberal enough for California Democrats. He was referring to when, over the weekend, the California Democratic Party did not endorse Feinstein at the party's convention. Many liberal activists said that she is too conservative or centrist.

"Democrats are their own worst enemy," Scarborough said.

"At this point," co-host Mika Brzezinski added.

Scarborough then referenced Barack Obama's speech at the 2004 Democratic National Convention, in which he discussed unifying the entire country as opposed to just specific groups within the Democratic voting coalition.

"I know it's a buzzword for conservatives, but it's true: identity politics will be the undoing of Democrats in 2020 if not 2018," Scarborough said.

He went on to say that Democrats spend too much time telling groups that they are victims rather than articulating a broader message "for the common good."