U.S. to Pay Out New Reparations for Holocaust

The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum
The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum / Getty Images

The State Department announced on Wednesday that additional reparation payments would be made to victims of the Holocaust as part of its claims program covering in part Jewish people who were deported by France during World War II.

"Within the next few days, all individuals whose claims were previously approved will receive a letter from the Department notifying them that they will receive an additional payment of 97 percent of their prior approved claim amount," the State Department said. "This amount is based on the funds remaining for approved claims."

"While no payment can provide complete justice for all who were impacted by deportation from France, we hope those affected by one of history's darkest eras will receive some additional relief from these further payments," the U.S. government said. "The Department’s Office of the Legal Adviser, through its International Claims and Investment Disputes Office, has administered the Holocaust Deportation Claims Program since its inception."

The reparations program was established by the United States with France under agreements relating to the deportation of Jews by the French government during the Holocaust.

France provided $60 million to the United States to distribute to Holocaust survivors and their living families under the agreement.

Initial payments to survivors included $204,000 for those who survived their deportation, $51,000 to living surviving spouses or those deported, and a pro rata amount if the individual died after 1948.

"Payments to date on approved claims total $30,028,500," according to the State Department. "With the additional payment of 97 percent of their prior approved claim amount, living survivors would receive in total $401,880; living surviving spouses would receive up to $100,470; and heirs of survivors and surviving spouses would receive a portion of these amounts."