Paul Krugman

Meet the Left-Wing Demagogues Who Earn Significantly More Than the Average CEO

Left-wing professors Paul Krugman and Robert Reich are some of the most outspoken demagogues on the subject of "income inequality," and routinely complain about the "pay gap" between CEOs and ordinary workers. For obvious reasons, they are less concerned about the pay gap between professional left-wing demagogues and ordinary CEOs. As Mark Perry at the American Enterprise Institute has pointed out, the average CEO makes far less than the income inequality scolds would have us believe—about $178,400 to be exact, which is significantly less than what Krugman and Reich take home in a given year.

Scottish Independence: Tell Me How This Ends

In the words of David Petraeus shortly after the invasion of Iraq in 2003: Tell me how this ends. Scotland, you may be aware, is voting on the question of independence from the UK today. The polls show a tight race, with all of the passion on the pro-independence side. When the votes are tallied early Friday morning, the results may well end the political connection between Scotland and England that has been in existence since 1707. Yet the unanswered questions about how an independent Scotland might actually function are innumerable. The Scottish National Party (SNP), which drives the independence movement, has invested a level of detailed planning in the post-independence aftermath that makes the U.S. post-war scheme for Iraq in 2003 look like the Schlieffen plan. Among the problems: how will Scotland pay for the vast welfare state that currently subsists on wealth transfers from England to the north? How will its presumed anti-nuclear stance square with membership in NATO? What will its currency be, considering that the Westminster government has said it won’t want them on the pound anymore? SNP answers to these questions are characterized by their wild optimism and thoroughgoing vagueness. Better to be free of the Westminster yoke now, and work out the details of a more perfect social democracy later.

Taxpayer-Funded Millionaire Fails to Comprehend the World

Paul Krugman is brimming with smart takes

Millionaire and public intellectual Paul Krugman takes homes a $225,000 salary (to do no actual work) from the publicly funded City University of New York. And that’s only a fraction of his total earnings, which include a six-figure salary from the New York Times, where he writes columns that regurgitate Democratic Party talking points in an authoritative voice. Krugman’s latest is an attack on Gov. Rick Perry (R., Texas), who just took an exceedingly handsome mug shot and may run for president in 2016. Perry is also the governor of the state that leads the nation in job growth, a fact that doesn’t sit well with partisan hacks like Krugman:

Left-Wing Wonk Bros Exchange High Fives on the Internet

There’s a phrase used to describe a group of bros who join hands (so to speak), arrange themselves in a circle, and indulge in a congratulatory display of mutual adulation. You know the one. Here’s an example of that, as it applies to the left-wing wonkosphere.

The Full Piketty

Experts raise questions about Frenchman's data on income inequality

America’s thought leaders have spoken. French economist Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century is The Most Important Intellectual Endeavor of the Decade (At Least). Unfortunately for the thought leaders, Piketty’s central thesis—that global income/wealth inequality has been rising precipitously for decades and will likely continue to do so because of capitalism—as well as the data he employs to support it, have come under attack in recent weeks from a number of prominent economic experts. Even Piketty’s thought-leading disciples concede that the Frenchman has some 'splaining to do.

Krugman Syndrome

The great thing about being a liberal is the warm, gooey feeling of self-satisfaction and moral superiority. By simply agreeing with liberal policies, or retweeting an OFA hashtag, or laughing at The Daily Show  (but not just laughing, you know? really getting it on a deeper level), you, too, can join the ranks of the enlightened. There you will be, on the right side of history, yelling, Onward! (As a former liberal who proudly voted for Barack Obama in 2008, I miss this feeling.)

EXPLAINED: The Income Inequality Debate, in 2 Charts

The liberal elite is very concerned about income inequality. Which stands to reason: being concerned about income inequality can be a rather lucrative endeavor for them. New York Times columnist and multimillionaire Paul Krugman, for example, will make about $25,000 per month (on top of his six-figure Times salary) just to be concerned about income inequality. His new employer, the taxpayer-funded City University of New York, is going to pay Krugman to “contribute to the build-up” of its new “inequality initiative.” Liberals have defended Krugman, noting that his tireless campaign for punitive taxes on the rich runs contrary to his own interest. It is within this crucial context that the following two charts explain the debate over income inequality:

Poor Paul Krugman

Last week, Gawker reported that New York Times columnist/New York Times best-selling author/ABC News contributor/Nobel Prize-winning economist and textbook author/Leigh Bureau featured speaker Paul Krugman will make $225,000 for nine months of “work” at the City University of New York’s Luxembourg Income Study Center, a research department devoted to the study of income inequality. Much mockery ensued. But Krugman’s fellow liberals rushed to his defense.