Former Dem Senate Candidate: 9/11 Shows Government ‘Hiding Something’

Ran on campaign finance reform, loaned own campaign $1 million

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Investment manager and former Democratic candidate for Senate Jim Barksdale tweeted Thursday the "real takeaway" from 9/11 is that the U.S. government is "corrupt" and works for "foreign powers."

"With the appropriate 9-11 reflections behind us, let's remember that the real takeaway from 9-11, as w/ Kennedy assassination, is that our Gov't is hiding something from us, as corrupt powers manipulate us into wars," Barksdale, who ran for U.S. Senate in Georgia in 2016, tweeted. "We need govt working for Americans; not $ and foreign powers."

Many conspiracy theories surround the 9/11 terrorist attacks as well as the death of President John F. Kennedy, often alleging that one or both were "inside jobs" orchestrated by the government.

In 2016, Barksdale lost his Georgia Senate race against Republican incumbent Johnny Isakson. He ran as an outsider candidate, frequently discussing his suspicion of the government in Washington, D.C. 

"I'm running for Senate because Georgia needs someone willing to stand against the crowd in Washington," Barksdale's campaign website states. "Whether you are conservative or liberal, employed or looking for work, entrepreneur or employee, young or old, rich or poor, you know that something is wrong in America today."

Barksdale proposed campaign finance reform but had difficulty communicating his campaign message, according to Atlanta magazine.

"Campaign finance reform is the most essential thing to fixing what's wrong in Washington," Barksdale said in one post-debate interview. "I don't have all the solutions. I have certain ideas, you know, in terms of how you equalize some of the funding. I can throw out my various ideas. But I think they aren't very well vetted out at this point, so I'd rather not."

Barksdale loaned $1 million to his own campaign. He lost the Senate race by nearly 14 points, garnering 41 percent of the vote to Isakson's 54.8 percent.