DNC Chair Completely Dodges Questions About State Department Links to Clinton Foundation

Brazile twice tries to change subject to DNC hack

Interim Democratic National Committee chairwoman Donna Brazile completely dodged questions Sunday about links between the Clinton Foundation and Hillary Clinton's State Department, at two points trying to change the subject to the hack of the DNC's emails.

More emails were released this week showing donors to the Clinton Foundation seeking access to the State Department when Clinton was secretary of state. In addition, an Associated Press report revealed more than half of the private individuals Clinton met with while she was at the State Department were Clinton Foundation donors.

"Based on what I've seen, I understand that there's a new round of fresh eyes looking at more emails that might be released," Brazile said on ABC This Week. "I've been dealing with another situation involving emails that were leaked. Private information that has been put out—"

"Let's stick with the foundation," host Martha Raddatz said.

"Well, I've got to stick with what I know," Brazile said, laughing. "I'm not an official at the State Department."

"I know, but answer that question," Raddatz said. "Do you have a problem with that co-mingling?"

Again, Brazile sought to bring up the hack of DNC emails, which ultimately led to former chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D., Fla.) resigning over revelations that party officials worked against Sen. Bernie Sanders (I., Vt.).

"I've been a government official, so this notion that somehow or another, someone who's a supporter, someone who's a donor, somebody who's an activist saying I want access, I want to come into a room, and I want to meet people … We often criminalize behavior that is normal," she said. "I don't see what the smoke is. I understand why it's being discussed, but like I said, I've been dealing with another situation, another email situation. The DNC was a victim of a cybercrime."

Raddatz noted to Brazile that the Clinton Foundation had announced it would not accept foreign or corporate donations if Clinton became president. Raddatz asked why it was appropriate for the foundation to accept such donations while Clinton ran the State Department but wouldn't be if she was in the White House.

Brazile again dodged, instead pointing out she was a supporter of the organization.

"They've helped millions of people across the globe and here in America," she said. "I think they've shown over and over again that they're willing to be transparent and that they've gone beyond the letter of the law to show that they are trying to make sure there are bright red, green, purple lines that will separate them from any type of conflict."