Pussy Riot Members Detained by Police in Sochi

Russian punk band Pussy Riot members Alyokhina and Tolokonnikova pose after winning a trophy in the category "Most Valuable Documentary of the Year" at the "Cinema for Peace" charity gala in Berlin

SOCHI, Russia (Reuters) – Pussy Riot protest band members Maria Alyokhina and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova said they were detained on suspicion of theft in the Winter Olympics host city of Sochi on Tuesday, less than two months after their release from prison under an amnesty.

Putin Hates Pussy Riot, Likes Russian Nickelback

Russian punk group Pussy Riot is languishing in prison, sentenced for hooliganism after an impromptu acoustic set at a church last year.

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‘Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer’ Mini-Review

I watched HBO’s Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer last night. It’s a pretty solid documentary, combining new interviews with footage taken from the punk collective’s various performances and rehearsals.

The documentary is centered around the trial of Maria Alekhina, Yekaterina Samutsevich, and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, a trio of punk rock activists who engaged in a blasphemous performance at Moscow’s Cathedral of Christ the Savior. They were protesting not only the patriarchal aspects of the church but also the confluence of church and state. Resurrected after being dismantled and repressed by the communists, the church has found an ally in Putin, and that alliance is manifesting itself in problematic ways, according to the lady-rockers.

I found the most intriguing aspect of the documentary to be not the tension between Pussy Riot and the state or Pussy Riot and the church, but between Pussy Riot and the people.