Iran, The New Yorker, and the Moral High Ground

AP

Thugs, theocrats, and dictators, take note: among your most important strategic assets is the ability to persuade America’s liberal elites that your raw grabs for power and territory are insignificant, in moral terms, when compared to what they see as the U.S.’s own record of aggression and wrongdoing. Your position will be even stronger if you can get a critical mass of State Department diplomats, writers for the New Yorker, and members of Congress believing that your hand has been forced by U.S. policy. You started a nuclear weapons program/invaded a European country/claimed a huge chunk of the Pacific ocean for yourself because America drove you to it! You’re depraved on account you’re deprived.

‘We’re On Our Own’

Wikimedia Commons

By the summer of 2013, President Obama had convinced several key Israelis that he wasn’t bluffing about using force against the Iranian nuclear program. Then he failed to enforce his red line against Syrian dictator Bashar Assad—and the Israelis realized they’d been snookered. Michael Oren, the former Israeli ambassador to the United States, recalls the shock inside his government. “Everyone went quiet,” he said in a recent interview. “An eerie quiet. Everyone understood that that was not an option, that we’re on our own.”

An Inside Look At How Obama Killed The U.S.-Israel Relationship

Michael B. Oren / AP

In his new memoir, former Israeli Ambassador Michael Oren documents the rapid dissolution of the historically close U.S.-Israel alliance under President Barack Obama. Oren recounts being threatened and intimidated at multiple junctures by Obama and his senior officials, marking many firsts in a relationship that has long been the cornerstone of American foreign policy.