OPINION: Cancel Presidential Elections

(grahamc99, flickr)

In 2012, more than 125 million Americans cast ballots in an election that only served to create greater partisan divisions, increase gridlock and generally make the President Obama’s life more difficult. His forward-looking agenda continues to take a back seat to petty grievances. One hundred and twenty-five million may sound like a lot, but that’s still less than 40 percent of the population of the United States, and less than one-tenth the population of China. Voter turnout was even lower than it was during the historic 2008 election, despite the fact that outside spenders spent nearly three times as much on partisan attack ads.

There was a time when presidential elections made sense—at our nation’s founding, everyone agreed that George Washington should be president, so he ran unopposed and was elected unanimously. Most people agree that he was on of the greatest presidents of all time. After that, politicians started running for president against each other, thus forever burdening the American people with a decision that many would rather someone else make on their behalf. Centuries later, presidential elections no longer make any sense.

Presidential elections, like midterm elections, aren’t just unnecessary; they’re harmful to American politics. We should get rid of them entirely.

Even the New York Times Agrees: Sean Eldridge Is the Worst Candidate of 2014

Goodbye for now.

A recent Free Beacon analysis concluded that Sean Eldridge, the Democrat running for Congress in New York’s 19th district, is the worst candidate of the 2014 cycle. On Friday, the New York Times endorsed our analysis. In a profile of Eldridge’s opponent, incumbent Rep. Chris Gibson (R., N.Y.), the Times described Eldridge as “a first-time Democratic candidate with a thin résumé and a thick wallet.”

There only one problem with the Times’ assessment. Eldridge may have a “thick wallet,” but it doesn’t belong to him. The money belongs to his husband, Chris Hughes, who made millions after being randomly selected to be Mark Zuckerberg’s roommate at Harvard. Hughes has already purchased two mansions in neighboring congressional districts in an effort to fulfill his husband’s political ambitions. When Eldridge loses in November, the couple will inevitably move somewhere else so he can run again.