Al Qaeda Poses New Risk to Saudi Security Amid Yemen Turmoil

People ride on the back of a truck with their home's furniture as they move from a neighbourhood after an air strike by a Saudi-led coalition struck a nearby missile base, in Yemen's capital Sanaa April 23

SHARURA, Saudi Arabia (Reuters) – As Saudi Arabian air strikes have hammered Yemen over the past month, Riyadh’s Western allies are believed to have grown increasingly worried by al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) taking advantage of the chaos to capture more ground.

America Retreats, al Qaeda Rises in Yemen

The evacuated U.S. Embassy in Sanaa, Yemen / AP

When President Obama name-checked Yemen as a success story during his announcement of strikes on the Islamic State in 2014, there was immediate skepticism from those who had been paying attention to the situation in that country, which at the time was threatened by a increasingly powerful Iranian-backed insurgency. Since then the skeptics have been proven correct, even as the White House takes a stroll onto Baghdad Bob territory with its position that all is well. The White House maintains a rosy line on the situation despite the facts that the U.S.-backed president has fled the country, the U.S. embassy has been evacuated (with Marines ordered to disable and abandon their weapons at the Sanaa airport, no less), we can’t account for half a billion dollars in military equipment, and the U.S. special operations task force training the Yemenis on counter-terror operations has also retreated from the country.