Advocates to Hold Fundraiser for Afghan Interpreters

A U.S. soldier with an Afghan interpreter speaking to a local man / AP

The United States will withdraw almost completely from Afghanistan at the end of the year, but for many of the Afghan interpreters that served alongside U.S. combat troops, their tour of duty is far from over.

Thousands of Afghan allies—who lived, worked, and dodged Taliban fire side by side with American soldiers, under the promise that they would be eligible for U.S. visas after their service—are facing increasing threats from enemy combatants as American troops withdraw, advocates say.

The Bear Is Loose

MAXIM SHIPENKOV/AFP/Getty Images

“The bear is loose!” President Obama has been saying, whenever he leaves the White House to visit Starbucks, or sandwich shops, or burger joints, or BBQ shacks, or neighborhood diners, in his increasingly rote and pathetic attempts to “connect” with “real people.” Obama, we have been told, is frustrated, “restless,” bored with the responsibilities and chores of office. He thinks of himself as the bear—intimidating, wild, untamed, roving—escaping his den. But he is flattering himself. Obama is not the bear. He is the cub: aimless, naïve, self-interested, self-indulgent, irresponsible, irresolute. The bear is in Moscow.