Proposed ‘Polercoaster’ in Vegas Would be World’s Tallest

'It goes very high, so you get an enormous amount of thrill from a very small amount of space'


A developer is moving forward with plans to build the world’s tallest roller coaster on the Las Vegas strip, called the “Polercoaster,” the Review-Journal reports.

U.S. Thrill Rides LLC’s proposed 650-foot-high scream machine would consist of an observation tower with a coaster on the way up and down, featuring loops, drops and spectacular views of America’s Playground. Some red tape remains in the way of an attraction destined to dazzle Sin City’s tourist hordes:

Because the FAA is still evaluating the project, critical pieces such as financing and a firm deal on the site still have not fallen into place.

However, U.S. Thrill Rides President Michael Kitchen said the company has held discussions with banks willing to furnish loans for the Polercoaster, with an estimated cost approaching $100 million.

He declined to comment on the location. A spokeswoman for Tropicana did not comment.

“This will be the tallest roller coaster in the world,” he said. “Since Las Vegas is one of the top tourist destinations in the world, we think it will get higher visibility and foot traffic than other places.”

Windmere, Fla.-based U.S. Thrill Rides has built about 300 rides, many of them roller coasters for amusement parks. Company founder and CEO Bill Kitchen came up with the Polercoaster idea to add a thrill ride to an existing destination that lacks much open land:

“It goes very high, so you get an enormous amount of thrill from a very small amount of space,” Bill Kitchen said. “Using a couple of acres that you would need for a regular roller coaster would be out of reach on the Strip because of the cost.”

The Polercoast would resemble something like the Stratosphere tower, with a round top that would including dining, retail and an observation deck. The Stratosphere, at 1,149 feet, would still be far taller.

On the Strip, only the unfinished Fontainbleau resort at 735 feet has gone higher than the proposed Polercoaster; the Palazzo would be 8 feet shorter.

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