Chelsea Clinton: Stop ‘Fat Shaming’ Spicer to Justify Increased White House ‘Opacity’

Chelsea Clinton / Getty

BY:

Chelsea Clinton on Tuesday failed to understand a joke made by President Donald Trump's chief strategist, Steve Bannon, about the lack of on-camera White House press briefings, leading her to blame the White House for fat shaming press secretary Sean Spicer.

"The White House using fat shaming to justify increased opacity. 2017," Clinton tweeted.

The former first daughter's tweet stemmed from an article in the Atlantic on the White House daily press briefing.

"The daily appearance by the press secretary hasn't been canceled entirely, as President Trump threatened. Instead, it's been steadily diminished," wrote the Atlantic‘s Rosie Gray.

"Asked why the briefings are now routinely held off-camera, White House chief strategist Steve Bannon said in a text message "Sean got fatter," and did not respond to a follow-up," Gray reported.

Clinton appeared to take Bannon's joke literally and said the White House is "using fat shaming to justify increased opacity."

Charlie Spiering, a White House correspondent for Breitbart News, pointed out to Clinton that Bannon was making a joke and not being serious.

Clinton responded to Spiering and continued to blame the White House for fat shaming Spicer.

Madeleine Weast

Madeleine Weast   Email Madeleine | Full Bio | RSS
Madeleine Weast is Assistant Social Media Editor for the Washington Free Beacon. She graduated from the University of Kansas in 2014. Prior to joining the Beacon, she was a Communications Fellow at The Charles Koch Institute. Madeleine is from Prairie Village, Kansas and lives in Washington, D.C. Her Twitter handle is @MadeleineWeast.

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