Editor's Blog

What We Can Learn From World War II

Hitler FDR Churchill Stalin

While visiting Hillsdale College this week, I was unexpectedly bequeathed a gift. When I arrived at the house where I am staying I discovered on the buffet table in the kitchen a small collection of books on military history, grand strategy, and World War II. Among them was the bound galley of Victor Davis Hanson’s The Second World Wars, published Tuesday by Basic Books. Having heard advance praise for the book, I picked up the hefty galley. I have not put it down since.

College President on Harassed Student: ‘Appropriate All of Us of Privilege Feel Uncomfortable’

Albion College observatory

The president of Michigan’s Albion College told a student who said his girlfriend was physically and verbally harassed by anti-racism protesters on campus that it was “appropriate that all of us of privilege feel uncomfortable from time to time,” according to audio of the meeting obtained by the Washington Free Beacon.

The Cost of Mercy

Americans like capital punishment. Support for the practice has remained at or above 60 percent since 1972, sometimes reaching as high as 80 percent. In 2016, a plurality of those surveyed said the death penalty was imposed “not enough,” while voters in Nebraska, Oklahoma, and California voted yes on pro-death-penalty referenda.

Kamala Harris Doubles Campaign Cash to Media Firm That Boosted Bernie’s Profile

Sen. Kamala Harris (D., Calif.) more than doubled her spending in the third quarter on an online media firm that played a major part in boosting the national profile of Sen. Bernie Sanders (D., Vt.) during his run for the Democratic presidential primary, Federal Election Commission filings show.

The Future of the Future

There’s a principle for evaluating new technology that receives less attention than it deserves. The principle might be phrased this way: The flagship is not the fleet. Which is to say, the best use of any new technology—the most striking and morally praiseworthy use, and the use for the sake of which we were urged to adopt something new—will rarely prove to be the most common use. Any technology distributed to a large number of people will quickly take on a life of its own, for good and for ill, as users turn the new technology toward the old ambitions, anxieties, and debaucheries of human nature.

Inside the Ring: China Eyes Pakistan Port

Chinese Type 052D missile destroyer Hefei

After opening its first foreign military base near the Horn of Africa, China is preparing to build a second military facility in Gwadar, Pakistan.

House Intelligence Panel is Reviewing Uranium One Deal Amid New Evidence of Russian Bribery

U.S. Capitol

The House Intelligence Committee has started asking federal agencies about the Obama administration’s approval of a Russian acquisition of a large uranium mine—a deal that is now under new scrutiny amid revelations about a sweeping Russian bribery scheme from an FBI informant.

Sen. Harris Quiet as Civil Rights Group Throws Support Behind Anti-Sex-Trafficking Bill

The National Urban League has thrown its weight behind a bill aimed at fighting online sex-trafficking, putting more pressure on Sen. Kamala Harris (D., Calif.) to take a public stand on the bill.

The NUL, a civil rights group that advocates on behalf of African-Americans, said sex trafficking disproportionately impacts minorities—and African-Americans in particular—and argues the bipartisan measure is long overdue, in a letter addressed to Senate leaders.

What We Can Learn From World War II

Hitler FDR Churchill Stalin

While visiting Hillsdale College this week, I was unexpectedly bequeathed a gift. When I arrived at the house where I am staying I discovered on the buffet table in the kitchen a small collection of books on military history, grand strategy, and World War II. Among them was the bound galley of Victor Davis Hanson’s The Second World Wars, published Tuesday by Basic Books. Having heard advance praise for the book, I picked up the hefty galley. I have not put it down since.

College President on Harassed Student: ‘Appropriate All of Us of Privilege Feel Uncomfortable’

Albion College observatory

The president of Michigan’s Albion College told a student who said his girlfriend was physically and verbally harassed by anti-racism protesters on campus that it was “appropriate that all of us of privilege feel uncomfortable from time to time,” according to audio of the meeting obtained by the Washington Free Beacon.

The Cost of Mercy

Americans like capital punishment. Support for the practice has remained at or above 60 percent since 1972, sometimes reaching as high as 80 percent. In 2016, a plurality of those surveyed said the death penalty was imposed “not enough,” while voters in Nebraska, Oklahoma, and California voted yes on pro-death-penalty referenda.

Kamala Harris Doubles Campaign Cash to Media Firm That Boosted Bernie’s Profile

Sen. Kamala Harris (D., Calif.) more than doubled her spending in the third quarter on an online media firm that played a major part in boosting the national profile of Sen. Bernie Sanders (D., Vt.) during his run for the Democratic presidential primary, Federal Election Commission filings show.

The Future of the Future

There’s a principle for evaluating new technology that receives less attention than it deserves. The principle might be phrased this way: The flagship is not the fleet. Which is to say, the best use of any new technology—the most striking and morally praiseworthy use, and the use for the sake of which we were urged to adopt something new—will rarely prove to be the most common use. Any technology distributed to a large number of people will quickly take on a life of its own, for good and for ill, as users turn the new technology toward the old ambitions, anxieties, and debaucheries of human nature.